Refugee Journalism

http://migrantjournalism.org/

The Refugee Journalism Project supports refugee and exiled journalists to re-start their careers in the UK.

It was founded in 2016 and since 2018, the project has been based exclusively at London College of Communication, part of the University of the Arts London.

These journalists arrive in the UK with an impressive range of skills – many have been editors, correspondents and producers in their own countries – but they lack agency and face significant barriers when they attempt to continue their journalism in the UK. Participants are offered a range of workshops, mentoring and placements.

The project’s core aims are to:

Help prepare refugee journalists for work in the UK media industry;

Create opportunities for refugee journalists to publish their work and build a wider network;

Engage with new audiences, key policy and opinion-maker in order to debunk negative and institutional and public perceptions of refugees.

The Refugee Journalism Project currently works with a number of organisations to deliver its activities, including the Refugee Council, the University of DerbyThe Guardian Foundation and the Google News Initiative.

http://migrantjournalism.org/about-us-2/

As part of this year’s Refugee Week, The Guardian Foundation invited participants in the project to write articles that reflect on the experiences, challenges and aspirations of displacement. Here are links to some of the articles.

In Conversation: Ziad Ghandour: BBC broadcasting journalist Ziad Ghandour was one of millions of people to escape their war-torn homeland in 2015. Ziad was forced to leave his English Literature master’s degree behind in Syria to search for a less volatile place to call home. Four months later, out of the back of a lorry, the UK gained an incredibly driven and intelligent young man.

In Conversation: Temesghen Debesai: Temesghen Debesai began his career in Eritrea, where he worked as a news anchor and co-founded the country’s first English television service in 1998. In 2006, he fled Eritrea and was granted refugee status in the UK. He joined the first cohort of the Refugee Journalism Project in 2016, and went on to work as a freelance journalist for the Thompson Reuters Foundation and BBC World Service. Temesghen is now a recipient of the Beyond Borders Bursary  and is currently completing an MA in Television at the London College of Communication. This month he launched ERI Hope Media which focuses on Eritrean topics.

Researchers Building Hope for the Future, by Hasnaa Omar: Academics, MPs and those working in the NGO sector discuss the key findings of an in-depth study that seeks to help overcome the perceived tension between host communities and refugees. 

Follow the project on Twitter, @refugeejourno

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